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Import Ban Vital to Prevent the Spread of CWD

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Press Release

August 22, 2019

Contact:

Tennessee – Public Affairs, (629) 204-0030

Alabama – Law Enforcement Section, (334) 242-3467

Alabama Conservation Enforcement Officer On Illegal Deer Importation Detail.

As deer season approaches, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR) and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) remind hunters that it is illegal to import whole carcasses and certain body parts of any species of deer into either state.

The import ban on deer in Alabama and Tennessee is part of a larger effort throughout the country to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) – a fatal neurological disease of white-tailed deer and other deer species, including mule deer, elk and moose.

“Working closely with our counterparts in neighboring states is one of the best ways we can prevent the spread of CWD,” said Chris Blankenship, ADCNR Commissioner. “It is vital to the health of our deer herd that out-of-state hunters know and follow the hunting regulations in both the state in which they live and the state in which they plan to hunt.”

Under the import bans, no person may import, transport, or possess a carcass or body part from any species of deer harvested anywhere outside of either state without properly processing it before bringing it

Conservation Enforcement Officers from Tennessee and Alabama confiscate an illegally imported out-of-state deer during the 2018-19 hunting season.

Importation of the following is allowed in both Alabama and Tennessee: deer meat that has been completely deboned; cleaned skull plates with attached antlers, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; raw capes, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if no root structure or other soft tissue is present; and finished taxidermy products or tanned hides. Velvet antlers are illegal to import into Alabama unless they are part of a finished taxidermy product.

Similar laws addressing the import of deer carcasses and body parts are on the books in other southern states as well.

Conservation Enforcement Officers from Tennessee and Alabama working together to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease – a fatal neurological disease of white-tailed deer and other deer species.

“Our greatest allies in the fight against CWD are hunters,” said Chuck Yoest, CWD coordinator for TWRA. “With hunters’ assistance we can help keep CWD from spreading, keep the number of diseased deer to a minimum, and reduce disease rates where possible.”

CWD is caused by a mutated protein called a prion. The disease is infectious, communicable, and always fatal for white-tailed deer. To date, no deer has tested positive for CWD in Alabama. CWD was discovered in parts of Mississippi and Tennessee in 2018. Since then, both states have implemented response plans in order to determine the prevalence of the disease and minimize its spread.

Once CWD arrives, infected deer serve as a reservoir for prions which will shed into the environment through saliva, urine, blood, soft-antler material and feces. There are no known management strategies to lessen the risk of indirect transmission of CWD once an environment has been contaminated. This makes eradication of CWD very difficult, if not impossible.

“Alabama has had a CWD surveillance program in place for white-tailed deer since 2001,” Blankenship said. “We have been fortunate so far, but we need the help of hunters to maintain our CWD-free status. To do so, it is very important for those who hunt out-of-state to know the laws before traveling.”

The public can assist the ADCNR Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division with its CWD monitoring program by reporting any illegal transport of deer or elk on Alabama’s roads and highways. Call the Operation Game Watch line immediately at (800) 272-4263 if you see deer or elk being transported in Alabama. In Tennessee, contact the TWRA Law Enforcement Division at (615) 781-6580.

For more information about how Alabama and Tennessee are working to prevent the spread of CWD, visit www.outdooralabama.com and www.CWDinTennessee.com.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources promotes wise stewardship, management and enjoyment of Alabama’s natural resources through four divisions: Marine Resources, State Lands, State Parks, and Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. To learn more about ADCNR, visit www.outdooralabama.com.

Photos by ADCNR

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Written by 49 County News.Net

August 22, 2019 at 4:03 PM

Posted in Announcements, News

Farm Service Agency Expands Payment Options

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Written by 49 County News.Net

August 21, 2019 at 10:54 AM

It’s Pumpkin Patch Time!

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Florence, Ala. – Each year, McGee Farm welcomes thousands of visitors to its pumpkin patch and to celebrate the arrival of fall. From September 28 to October 31, 2019, McGee Farm will be open daily to the public, inviting everyone to a fun-filled pumpkin picking experience along with additional on-the-farm fun activities.

Located in Florence, Ala., McGee Farm is now in its 23rd year of opening the family farm for visitors to find the perfect carving or cooking pumpkin. Visitors have a choice of picking their orange treasure straight off the vine from the pumpkin patch or from a pile that have been pre-picked. Over 25 varieties of pumpkins are available to choose from, with some growing up to 200 pounds and some as small as a child’s hand.

Along with pumpkins of all shapes and sizes, visitors are treated to farm-life activities such as playing in hay, taking a scenic tractor-drawn wagon ride, a barnyard bounce and feeding chickens.

For those who want a piece of the autumn season to enjoy at home, fall decorations, such as straw bales, corn stalks and miniature gourds, will be available to purchase. In addition to pumpkins, McGee Farm grows all of the colorful mums that are for sale each year. Visitors can pick from thousands of pots and many color variations.

After shopping for pumpkins, guests are invited to stay and enjoy a bite to eat at The Kitchen at McGee Farm. Home-cooked country favorites such as white beans and cornbread, soups, muffins, homemade treats, pies and more will be available to purchase. McGee Farm has a picnic area under a huge oak tree where guests can have picnics or can sit and enjoy the scenic countryside. Homemade jams, jellies, and relishes will also be for sale for visitors to enjoy at home or to give as gifts for the upcoming holiday season.

McGee Farm is open to the general public and group tours Monday through Friday 3 to 6 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. beginning September 28 until October 31, 2019. Admission to the farm is free. Cost for the tractor-drawn wagon ride is $3 per person. School tour and group tour rates and reservations are available upon request. Pumpkin prices begin at $1, with larger pumpkins sold at 45 cents per pound. Birthday parties are also available upon request.

McGee Farm is a working family farm located at 8221 County Road 7 in Florence. For more information, visit www.mcgeefarm.com or follow them on Facebook. To make a reservation for a group tour, contact Amy McGee at 256.766.2725.

Written by 49 County News.Net

August 21, 2019 at 10:43 AM

Winfield City Council Meeting 08/20/2019

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Written by 49 County News.Net

August 20, 2019 at 8:54 PM

Guin City Council Meeting 08/19/2019

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Written by 49 County News.Net

August 19, 2019 at 8:12 PM

Hamilton City Council Meeting 08/19/2019

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Written by 49 County News.Net

August 19, 2019 at 8:11 PM

Mules, Music and More! Winfield’s Mule Day Set for Sept. 27-29

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Winfield, Alabama – Mule Day, a two-day event centered on mules and their role in rural farming, returns to the streets of downtown Winfield September 27-29, 2019, bringing with it free family fun. A car show, tractor show, tractor pulls, 5K run, live music, a carnival, a Civil War reenactment and a parade are all on the agenda as the town celebrates its agricultural heritage.

Mule Day kicks off on Friday evening, September 27 at 6 p.m. when shoppers are invited to shop with local merchants and among 400 vendors during the Mule Night Madness. Runners can take part in a midnight 5K run and there will be clogging, line dancing and live music on Friday evening and again during the day on Saturday.

On Saturday, September 28, the festivities get underway at 7 a.m. As Festival goers wander through the town, approximately 400 arts and crafts vendors and flea market vendors will be selling their wares. Tractor pulls are slated for 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the Foodland parking lot, and throughout the day, antique cars and bikes will be on display in the grove at Winfield Middle School. Not to be missed at 11 a.m. is the highlight of the annual event – the parade of mules, horses, jacks and jennies through downtown. Chuck Mullins will be this year’s Mule Day honoree.

A Civil War reenactment and living history are also held in conjunction with Mule Day. The Skirmish at the Luxapalilla includes hands-on living history presentations, authentic encampments and demonstrations from artillery, cavalry and infantry. Held at the Winfield City Park, battles will take place on Saturday, September 28 and Sunday, September 29 at 2 p.m. The public is also invited to a Civil War Period Ball on Saturday at 7 p.m. at the park.

Admission to Mule Day is free. Shuttle service, sponsored by Winfield Church of Christ, will be offered on Saturday only. For more information, visit http://www.winfieldcity.org/ or call the Winfield Chamber of Commerce at 205.487.3002.

Written by 49 County News.Net

August 17, 2019 at 10:32 AM

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